Schedule and Materials

WeekClassDateTopicsQuiz
(Pre-class; ID req.)
Project in-class
activities & deadlines
(Pre-class; ID req.)
Postings
(Pre or in-class, ID req.)


Module I: Setting the Stage
11Tu 01/20Introductions | Class Overview | Survey----Intro Blog
12Th 01/22Overview of Greenhouse Gases Emissions | Concept Survey02-Quiz----
23Tu 01/27Climate Change and Food Systems in Wisconsin and Worldwide03-Quiz--Minute Paper


Module II: Case Study: Carbon Footprint of Organic versus Conventional Milk
24Th 01/29Introduction to our Case Study | Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)04-Quiz--Minute Paper
35Tu 02/03Greenhouse Gases from Livestock I: Grazing Versus Confinement05-Quiz--Minute Paper
36Th 02/05Greenhouse Gases from Livestock II: Grazing Versus Confinement06-Quiz--Minute Paper
47Tu 02/10Greenhouse Gases from Livestock III: Manure Management07-Quiz--Minute Paper
48Th 02/12Greenhouse Gases from Crop I08-QuizProject Ideas BlogMinute Paper
59Tu 02/17Greenhouse Gases from Crop II (and project discussion)--Project Idea & Citations dueMinute Paper
510Th 02/19Greenhouse Gases from Crop III10-QuizProject Poll due by Friday 2/20Minute Paper
611Tu 02/24Best Practices and Emerging OptionsNo Quiz--Minute Paper
612Th 02/26Social Aspects of Food Systems, Sustainability and Climate I 12-QuizTeams finalizedMinute Paper
713Tu 03/03Social Aspects of Food Systems, Sustainability and Climate II13-Quiz--Minute Paper
714Th 03/05HTML workshop: students create project web page----Minute Paper
815Tu 03/10Group project literature search----
816Th 03/12In-class MIDTERM----


Module III: Student project case studies (Please see Team Project Page for more details)
917Tu 03/17Library Workshop--Library Database Workshop
918Th 03/19Library Workshop--Library Database Workshop
1019Tu 03/24Student-led JOURNAL CLUB: Teams C,G,&H--Journal Club
1020Th 03/26Student-led JOURNAL CLUB: Teams A,D,&E--Journal Club
---------Spring Break Recess (03/30 - 04/03)

1121Tu 04/07Student-led JOURNAL CLUB: Teams B&E--Journal Club
1122Th 04/09Workday----
1223Tu 04/14Project discussion: Teams C (Rachel/Doug) & H (Di/Fei) --Discussion / Partial Report
1224Th 04/16Project discussion: Teams A (Julia, Alisha, Soo) & G (Claire/Jordan) --Discussion / Partial Report
1325Tu 04/21Project discussion: Teams D (Tim/Gabe/Nicole) & F (Aida, Jeremy, Adeline)--Discussion / Partial Report
1326Th 04/23Project discussion: Teams B (Monica/Jordan) & E (Chelsea, Will, Ryan)--Discussion / Partial Report--
----Fr 04/24Midnight deadline for:--Initial paper
1427Tu 04/28Work day and formative course evaluation----
1428Th 04/30Web page/paper presentations: Rachel & Doug | Will, Ryan, & Chelsea | Claire and Jordan--Final Presentation
1529Tu 05/05Web page/paper presentations: Tim, Gabe, & Nicole | Aida, Jeremy, & Adeline--Final Presentation
1530Th 05/07Web page/paper presentations: Di & Fei | Monica & Jordan | Julia, Alisha, & Soo  --Final Presentation
----Th 05/144:00 pm dropbox deadline for 1) final paper and 2) peer-and-self evaluation. ----
-- -- Th 05/14 4:00 pm deadline for last modifications to project webpage-- ----

Module I: Setting the Stage
  • 01 Tu 01/20
    • Synopsis: For the first day of class, one of our objectives is to get to know each other, to take a couple on-line survey and discuss the results.
    • Pre-class assignment: None.
    • In-class activity: Intro Blog | Survey of your views on Climate Change and on U.S. Agriculture.
  •  03 Tu 01/27
    • Synopsis: The paper of Vermeulen  et al., (2012) suggests that the impact of climate change on global food systems are expected to be widespread, complex, geographically and temporally variable, and profoundly influenced by socioeconomic conditions. Climate change will impact agricultural yields, food prices, and food safety. Low-income producers and consumers of food will be particularly vulnerable.
    • Pre-class reading: Please read Dr. Morales's notes on how to read a paper, and also Vermeulen et al., (2012) 
    • In-class activity: Activity 1, Activity 2, Activity 3
Module II: Case Study: Carbon Footprint of Organic versus Conventional Milk
  • 04 Th 01/29
    • Synopsis: Life Cycle Assessment (cradle-to-grave analysis) offers the livestock industry a structured methodology to quantify environmental impact including GHG emissions. An LCA can help identify components or processes within production systems that should be targeted to reduce environmental impact. The paper of Beauchemin and McGeough (2013) introduces us to the LCA and its application to livestock ruminant agriculture. The authors felt compelled to end their conclusion with the following statement: "Ruminants make a useful contribution to society in that they produced high quality energy and protein for human consumption from land areas and cellulosic materials that would otherwise be very difficult to exploit. What do you think?
    • Pre-class reading: Please read Beauchemin and McGeough 2013)
    • In-class activities: LCA Q&A
  • 05 Tu 02/03
    • Synopsis: Today, we are moving deeper into studying the sources of GHG emissions from dairy farms with the idea of finding relevant literature that shed some light on our case study (comparing organic versus conventional dairy systems). The paper of O'Brien et al. (2014) fits here because it compares various methods to allocate co-products; it compares grass-based dairy system from Ireland to confinement systems from the U.K and the United States. One of the main findings is that without accounting for carbon sequestration in the grassland (pasture) the grass-based and confinement dairy systems had similar carbon foot print per ton of milk. I am very curious to learn more on how grassland carbon sequestration was estimated?
    • Pre-class reading: Please read O'Brien et al., (2014). For today's class, please read the Abstract, Introduction, and Materials and Methods only.
    • In-class activities: Understanding O'Brien et al. (2014) LCA Approach | Board Pictures from class discussion: Confinement versus Grass-based system.
  • 06 Th 02/05
    • Synopsis: Today, we will continue our comparative analysis of grass-based and confinement dairy system. Because the work of O'Brien and colleagues found that enteric emission is by far the main source of GHG on a dairy farm regardless of production system, we should be spending sometimes trying to learn how enteric methane is predicted (by IPCC) and the factors and influence enteric methane. Be prepared, we are going to look at numbers and equations in a spreadsheet.
    • Pre-class reading: Please read O'Brien et al., (2014). For today's class, please read the Resullts, Discussion and Conclusion of the article.
    • In-class activities: Result, Discussion and Conclusion Activity | Calculating Dairy Cow Enteric Methane Emission. For your reference only, feel free to have a look at the related IPCC (2006) document.
  • 07 Tu 02/10
    • Synopsis: We have learned so far that enteric emission of methane and the emission of methane and nitrous oxide from dairy cattle are substantial contributors to milk carbon footprint for both grazing and confinement herds. Although nutrition (diet composition) is one of the most powerful driver of these emissions, today, we'll focus our attention on factors affecting emission from manure management. The paper of Chadwick et al. (2011) reviews factors affecting emissions from contrasting manure management practices whereas the article of Owen and Silver (2015) "is throwing a wrench" into the "standard" IPCC equations predicting emission from managed manure systems. The "story" clearly is still unfolding and scientists have yet to come with the final words. One of the limitation of today's discussion is that none of the articles discuss emissions from fecal and urinary deposition of cattle on pasture. There is always more to learn !
    • Pre-class reading: Please read the Abstract, Section 1: Scope and Introduction, Section 4: Potential Mitigation and Section 5: Conclusions of Chadwick et al. (2011). Then, read the Abstract, Introduction, Sources of GHG on Dairies, Discussion and Conclusions of Owen and Silver (2015). The 07-Quiz questions have been limited only to the assigned reading sections.
    • In-class activities: Understanding Manure System | Trade-offs between Revenue and Emission on Wisconsin dairy systems from Dutreuil et al. (2015)
  • 10 Th 02/19
    • Synopsis: Carbon sequestration becomes an important issue if we switched the mind set from "reducing" emission to "offsetting" emissions within our agricultural systems. According to Lad (2004), strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management, manuring and sludge application, improved grazing, water conservation and harvesting, efficient irrigation, agroforestry practices, and growing energy crops on spare lands.
    • Pre-class assignmentLal (2004): Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food Security.
    • In-class activitySoil_and_Carbon_Slides.pptx
  • 12 Th 02/26
    • Synopsis: Today's class and next Tuesday's class will analyze why people (in this case farmers) do what they do, and how we can organize to protect common property resources like our climate.  Social-psychological, institutional, political, economic, and technological factors will be explored.  Today, we will identify some market forces that make it hard to coordinate behavior and protect the environment.  The bottom line is that, while free-market exchange generates many benefits, it is useful to understand the ways it generates some problems, so that we can collectively choose how to deal with them. 
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read Ostrom et al. 1999 - Revisiting the Commons , Bell 2009 - Treadmill of Production , and Wright 2010 - What's So Bad About Capitalism? (in Wright, skip the sections that are crossed out in red (diagonally across the text); especially important sections are marked in red along the sides)
    • Slides from class.
  • 13 Tu 03/03
    • Synopsis: Today's class will explore a case study of farmers who developed an environmental and social mission-driven cooperative business (Organic Valley). This case is unique because the cooperative has achieved a powerful enough position to exert political and economic pressure to forward its environmental and social values, both politically and through the market, and it has done so without "conventionalizing," or becoming a profit-driven, "race-to-the-bottom" type of firm. Organic Valley has, to some degree, successfully organized against the problems of over-supply (and consequential low prices) and negative environmental externalities.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read Organic Valley on Climate Change and check out Organic Dairy Ratings.
    • Slides from class
  • 14 Th 03/05
    • Synopsis: Today we will have a web-page development workshop with a guest instructor from DoIT.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please start the on-line course HTML Essential Training with James Williamson.  Complete chapters 1 and 2, plus "Formatting content in HTML" and "Using headings" from section 3. To access Lynda.com from off-campus, first go to the DoIT Services Online Training, then click on UW-Madison Lynda.com Login. You may have trouble connecting to DoIT with Chrome, but Windows Explorer and Safari should work.
    • Group project assignments are ready Check Group project assignments.
  • 16 Th 03/12
    • Synopsis: Good luck on your Midterm !
    • Pre-class assignment: None
    • In-class Activity: None
  • 18 Tu 03/19
    • Synopsis: Our Friendly librarians will be present to help with any literature search questions, but most of class will be devoted to working with your group and getting feedback from the instructors.
    • Pre-class assignment: You are expected to work with your teammate to move your project along. Please visit the Group Projects Page for more details
    • In-class Activity: None Available
  • 19 Tu 03/24
    • Synopsis: In this section of the class we have student-led discussion of one article that was identified by the team as very relevant to their project. The goals of the discussion are to help everyone gain an overall understanding of the paper including the methodology to carry out the research and to learn the main findings of the scientific report. More specifically the discussion should also provide the team with useful, constructive comments and suggestions from classmates to engage more deeply in the case study at hand.
    • Pre-class assignment: You are expected to read the articles posted by teams C, G, and H. Please visit the Group Projects Page for more details
    • In-class Activity: Each team has 23 minutes to engage classmates in the pre-assigned reading; Be original, make it interesting for all of us!
  • 20 Th 03/26
    • Synopsis: In this section of the class we have student-led discussion of one article that was identified by the team as very relevant to their project. The goals of the discussion are to help everyone gain an overall understanding of the paper including the methodology to carry out the research and to learn the main findings of the scientific report. More specifically the discussion should also provide the team with useful, constructive comments and suggestions from classmates to engage more deeply in the case study at hand.
    • Pre-class assignment: You are expected to read the articles posted by teams A, D, and F. Please visit the Group Projects Page for more details
    • In-class Activity: Each team has 23 minutes to engage classmates in the pre-assigned reading; Be original, make it interesting for all of us!
  • 21 Tu 04/07
    • Synopsis: In this section of the class we have student-led discussion of one article that was identified by the team as very relevant to their project. The goals of the discussion are to help everyone gain an overall understanding of the paper including the methodology to carry out the research and to learn the main findings of the scientific report. More specifically the discussion should also provide the team with useful, constructive comments and suggestions from classmates to engage more deeply in the case study at hand.
    • Pre-class assignment: You are expected to read the articles posted by teams B and E. Please visit the Group Projects Page for more details
    • In-class Activity: Each team has 23 minutes to engage classmates in the pre-assigned reading; Be original, make it interesting for all of us!
  • 22 Th 04/09
    • Synopsis: Workday for students to interact among themselves and instructional team to advance their projects.
    • Pre-class assignment:
    • In-class Activity:
  • 23 Tu 04/14
    • Synopsis: Today we start our series of team-lead discussion/partial report
    • Pre-class assignment:
    • In-class Activity: Presenters: Teams C (Rachel/Doug) & H (Di/Fei). Please see group project page for details on how we plan to organize the discussion.
  • 24 Th 04/16
    • Synopsis: Continuation of our series of team-lead discussion/partial report
    • Pre-class assignment:
    • In-class Activity: Presenters: Teams A (Julia, Alisha, Soo) & G (Claire/Jordan). Please see group project page for details on how we plan to organize the discussion.
  • 25 Tu 04/21
    • Synopsis: Continuation of our series of team-lead discussion/partial report
    • Pre-class assignment:
    • In-class Activity: Presenters: Teams D (Tim/Gabe/Nicole) & F (Aida, Jeremy, Adeline). Please see group project page for details on how we plan to organize the discussion.
  • 26 Th 04/23
    • Synopsis: Continuation of our series of team-lead discussion/partial report
    • Pre-class assignment:
    • In-class Activity: Teams B (Monica/Jordan) & E (Chelsea, Will, Ryan). Please see group project page for details on how we plan to organize the discussion.
  • 27 Tu 04/28
    • Synopsis: Work day, formative feedback on project web page, and formative course evaluation
    • Pre-class assignment: Please continue work on your project web page.
    • In-class Activity: Follow-up Concept Assessment



Keywords:   Doc ID:46049
Owner:Michel W.Group:DS Food Systems, Sustainability and Climate Change
Created:2015-01-08 14:33 CSTUpdated:2015-06-11 15:36 CST
Sites:DS Food Systems, Sustainability and Climate Change
Feedback:  4   2