2017-Schedule and Materials


Please note that rows with blue shading in the table below denote classes that focus on skills or material for team projects. Rows in white denote classes in which material on the instructor case will be presented.


Week Class Date Topics Pre-class Blogs
(Pre or in-class,
ID req.
)
 
Quizzes
(Post or in-class, ID req.)
1 1 Tu 01/17 Introductions | Class Overview | Concept Survey Intro-Blog 01-Survey  | 02-Survey
2 2 Th 01/19 Overview of Greenhouse Gas Emissions  01 Blog 01-Quiz | 02-Quiz
1 3 Tu 01/24 Sustainability of the US Dairy Industry| Intro. to Instructors' Case Study 02 Blog 03-Quiz
2 4 Th 01/26 Team Work Workshop and Intro to Instructors' Case Study -- --
3 5 Tu 01/31 Food Systems | Key Concepts 03 Blog 04-Quiz
3 6 Th 02/02 Case Study | Library Workshop -- --
4 7 Tu 02/07 Methods to assess food systems 04 Blog 05-Quiz
4 8 Th 02/09 Case Study | HTML workshop -- --
5 9 Tu 02/14 Guest: Corbett Grainger on institutions and decision making 05 Blog 06-Quiz
5 10 Th 02/16  Food systems and race, gender, ethnicity, and class: International 06 Blog 07-Quiz
--- --- --- Class Field Trip (Sat 02/18) --
6 11 Tu 02/21 Food systems and race, gender, ethnicity, and class: Domestic 07 Blog 08-Quiz
6 12 Th 02/23 Case Study| Team Project Work Day 08 Blog
7 13 Tu 02/28  Guest: Kathryn Anderson on institutions and decision making 09 Blog 09-Quiz
7 14 Th 03/02 Food waste, composting, and digesters 10 Blog 10-Quiz
8 15 Tu 03/07 Food waste and the Farm Bill 11 Blog
8 16 Th 03/09 Teams A & B & C presentations Fdbk A| B | C
9 17 Tu 03/14 Teams D & E & F presentations Fdbk D| E | F
9 18 Th 03/16 CLASS CANCELLED 
--- --- --- Spring Break Recess (03/20 - 03/26) --
10 19 Tu 03/28 Virtual international guests: Josephine Peigne (France) and Doris Pellerin (Quebec) 14 Blog | 15 Blog 
10 20 Th 03/30 Virtual international guests: Carlos Arriaga (Mexico) and Carlos Gomez (Peru) 16 Blog| 17 Blog 
11 21 Tu 04/04 Life Cycle Assessment  18 Blog 11-Quiz
11 22 Th 04/06 Milk Carbon footprint: Pasture vs. Conventional 19 Blog 12-Quiz
12 23 Tu 04/11 Overview of Sustainable Crop Production 20 Blog 13-Quiz
12 24 Th 04/13 GHG emissions from soil (N2O) 21 Blog 14-Quiz
13 25 Tu 04/18 GHG emissions from Manure (N2O + CH4) 22 Blog 15-Quiz
13 26 Th 04/20 Carbon Sequestration 23 Blog 16-Quiz
-- -- Fr 04/21 11:59 pm Deadline for First Version of Papers and Websites --
14 27 Tu 04/25 Debate: Feeding America with Insects? --
14 28 Th 04/27 Teams A & F Presentations | Course Eval. 1  Fdbk A| F 
15 29 Tu 05/02 Teams C & D Presentations | Course Eval. 2 Fdbk C| D 
15 30 Th 05/04 Teams E & B Presentations | Course Eval. 3 Fdbk E
-- -- Tu 05/09
12:00 pm Dropbox deadline for 1) final paper (grads) and 2) peer-and-self evaluation. 
--
--  --  Th 05/11
12:00 pm Deadline for last modifications to project webpage (undergrads) & course evaluations
-- --

  •   01 Tu 01/17
    • Synopsis: For the first day of class, one of our objectives is to get to know each other, to take a couple of on-line surveys and discuss the results.
    • Pre-class assignment: None.
    • In-class activity: Introduction of instructional teams | Brief Discussion of "Food Systems, Sustainability and Climate Change | Introductions of Students. 
    • Post Class Assignment: Please complete the 01-Survey in regards to your views on Climate Change and 02-Survey in regards to your views on U.S. Agriculture. See links above.
  •   02 Th 01/19
    • Synopsis: Today's class focuses on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and Greenhouse Gas Effect in relation to food systems. The main objective is to discuss the main sources of GHG, to gauge the contribution of agriculture to national emissions, and to learn some statistics related to emissions at the global scale. The paper of Vermeulen  et al., (2012) suggests that the impact of climate change on global food systems are expected to be widespread, complex, geographically and temporally variable, and profoundly influenced by socioeconomic conditions. Climate change will impact agricultural yields, food prices, and food safety. Low-income producers and consumers of food will be particularly vulnerable.
    • Pre-class assignments: Please read the following web pages from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):
      Overview of Greenhouse Gases (make sure to read the overview page and the pages on Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Nitrous Oxide);
      Sources of GHG Emissions (make sure to read the overview page and the pages on Agriculture and Land Use/Forestry);
      National Emissions Data;
      Global Emissions Data.
      Please also read Section 1 (Introduction) and Section 2 (Impacts of Food Systems on Climate Change) of Vermeulen et al., (2012).
      Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 01-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activity: Activity 1: GHG from Food Systems  | Activity 2: GHG from Agriculture | Activity 3: Enteric Emissions from Livestock  Activity 4: Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Agricultural Soils.
    • Post-class assignment: Please complete 01-Quiz (Overview of GHG) and 02-Quiz (Vermeulen et al. article). See links above.
  •   05 Tu 01/31
    • SynopsisToday's class will focus on exploring the various pieces of the food system and the ways in which they interact. This discussion will set the stage for both the instructor and student projects alike as we work towards understanding the impacts of the many pieces that make up food systems.
    • Pre-class assignments: Before class, please read Neff 2015 and Cassidy and Patterson 2008. The Neff reading will provide some background on how systems thinking and some other important concepts apply to the food system. The Cassidy and Patterson reading then looks at the food systems from the perspective of one discipline of actors within the food system: urban planners. Pay attention to how concepts such as complex adaptive systems, resiliency, and wicked problems which are explored in the Neff chapter are identified and addressed by urban planners in Cassidy & Patterson. Graduate students should, in addition to these two readings and the blog post, peruse this DVRPC 2010 report on the Philadelphia area food system to further explore how local policy makers can address food systems problems. Also, please remember to submit any further ideas for final project topics to the course TA via email before class. They will be considered for addition to the list that students will choose from when selecting their final topics. 
    • Also, please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 03-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activity: Follow along and take notes in Dr. Morales' Power Point Presentation 
    • Post-class assignment: Complete 04-Quiz (Neff article). See link above.
  •   06 Th 02/02
    • SynopsisFor undergraduate students our friendly librarian will be giving us a hands-on guided tour of database search, proper citations for your web pages, and other things to consider as you build webpages with materials found on the internet in our regular classroom. For graduate students the writing center is holding a special session of their "writing a literature review" workshop for us. During our normal class time report to 6171 H.C. White where the writing center is housed and they will have a session set up for us in one of their conference rooms.
    • Pre-class assignment: You are expected to work with your teammate(s) to move your project along. Please visit the Group Projects Page for more details.
    • In-class Activity: You can follow along in this handout that our librarian has provided to guide us through class
  •   07 Tu 02/07
    • Synopsis: Today we'll be exploring various methods that can be used to assess sustainability and impact of food systems processes in order to determine which method may be appropriate for student projects and the instructor's example project. What are the benefits and drawbacks of each method? What research questions are most appropriate for each? These are the questions we'll explore in today's class.
    • Pre-class assignments: Think about the roles and responsibilities for your team by looking at this worksheet as a guide. For the following class on 2/9, we will ask you to submit this to us.  The reading for today's class is: Aubin et al. 2013. Graduate students should read the whole chapter, while undergraduate students are assigned only 10.1 Introduction (pp. 198-200), 10.4 Environmental, Social, Economic, & Nutritional Methods and Indicators (pp. 207-222), and 10.6 Conclusion (pp. 225-226). 
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 04-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activities: Research Methods in the Biological and Social Sciences: An overview presentation available as a pptx doc or pdf doc | Comparative Analysis to Assess Sustainability with the MESMIS method
    • Post-class assignment: Complete 05-Quiz (Aubin et al. paper). See link above. (The quiz covers only material from the sections that everyone has been assigned.)
  •   08 Th 02/09
    • SynopsisToday we will have a web-page development workshop with a guest instructor from DoIT.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please start the on-line course HTML Essential Training with James Williamson.  Complete chapters 1 and 2, plus "Formatting content in HTML" and "Using headings" from section 3.  Also, please fill in your Roles and Responsibilities Worksheet in your groups and submit it in the dropbox before class. You should only submit one per team.
    • Additional Web-Page design Resources: To access Lynda.com from off-campus, first go to the DoIT Services Software Training for Students page, under the last heading "Online Technology Training (Lynda.com)" click on "access Lynda.com". This will prompt you to enter your NetID and take you to Lynda.com where you will have access to all of the chapters in the assigned video. You may have trouble connecting to DoIT with Chrome, but Windows Explorer and Safari should work. See also free 30 minute consulting from the Design Lab.
  •   09 Tu 02/14
    • Synopsis: Today we will have a guest speaker, Professor Corbett Grainger, from UW-Madison's agricultural economics department. He will give a presentation on how sustainability is understood in agricultural economics, drawing on a case study from his research.  
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read the short Costello et al paper and the Solow 1991 paper that will give us background on the possibility of fisheries collapse and on the concept of sustainability in economics. 
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 05-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activity: Professor Corbett Grainger will give us a presentation. 
    • Post-class assignment: Please complete 06-Quiz (Costello et al. paper and Solow paper). See link above.
  •   10 Th 02/16 
    • SynopsisToday our focus will be on race, ethnicity, class and gender aspects of food systems in an international context. 
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read the Mertz et al. paper and the Agarwal paper (ONLY PAGES 1247-1256) that will, respectively, present a case study on how farmers in the Sahel region perceive and adapt to climate change and give us a context of food sovereignty, and food security in a time of climate change. 
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 06-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activity: Discussion of "sustainability domains" and breakout into teams to identify and explain factors within domains that impact the Sahelian food system affected by climate change in the Mertz et al. paper.
    • Post-class assignment: Please complete 07-Quiz (Mertz et al. paper and Agarwal paper (pgs 1247-1256)). See link above. *This 07-Quiz will close on SUNDAY, 2/19 at 11:59 pm* 
  • Field Trip Sat 02/18
    • SynopsisPlease visit the field trip page for information about today's class. Please meet at the Dairy Cattle Center (1815 Linden Drive) between 7:45 and 7:55 am so that we can depart at 8 am.
    • Pre-class assignment: Look over these materials about the first farm we will visit: Welcome to Rosy Lane | Rosy Lane Farm Fact Sheet and think of questions to ask our hosts.
  •   11 Tu 02/21
    • SynopsisToday's class will focus on race, ethnicity, class and gender aspects of food systems in a domestic context.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read CitiesofFarmers-Chapter12 and CitiesofFarmers-Chapter8. OPTIONAL, BUT HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: This is a very interesting article by Julie Guthman on the reproduction of whiteness in the alternative food movement (i.e. farmers' markets): Whiteness and Bringing Good Food to Others.
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 07-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class Activity: TBD.
    • Post-class assignment: Please complete 08-Quiz (Chapters 8 and 12 of Cities of Farmers). See link above. *This 08-Quiz will open on Sunday, 2/19 at 2 pm and close at the normal time of WED, 2/22 at 4 pm.* 
  •   12 Th 02/23
    • Synopsis: Case study discussion and team project work day. We will do a teamwork evaluation in class, so don't skip class!
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read the Los Braceros article. 
    • Please complete your journal entry  - a special debate assignment- whose instructions can be found on the FSSCC Class Debate page and your 08-Blog on the pre-class reading (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class Activity: We will discuss Latino dairy workers in Wisconsin, complete a teamwork assessment, and work on your group projects.

  •  13 Th 02/28
    • SynopsisToday's class will feature Kathryn Anderson (PhD candidate in Sociology and Environmental Studies) who will be giving a talk on organic vs. conventional milk production using a real case study. She will ask us to think about how and why some dairy farms might choose to produce conventional or organic milk, and what kind of institutional structure and organization can make a conventional or organic farming operation "successful." 
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read Yifat_2015_Organic Valley Case Study.
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 09-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class Activity: Kathryn Anderson's talk on cooperative business models in the dairy sector!
    • Post-class assignment: Please complete 09-Quiz (Yifat 2015 - Organic Valley Case Study) (see link in calendar above). 

  •   14 Th 03/02
    • Synopsis: This class will focus on food waste, composting, and anaerobic digesters. ANNOUNCEMENT: Your first short essay assignment is due TONIGHT to the Dropbox (link on the Syllabus page) at 11:59 PM (CST).
    • Pre-class assignment: Read Heller and Keoleian 2014. Also, please view this 7 min PBS NewsHour segment (aired March 28, 2016): Turning Poop into Power, Not Pollution.
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 10-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class Activity: Sarah will present a case study on food and other wastes and anaerobic digesters. 
    • Post-class assignment: Please complete 10-Quiz (Heller and Keoleian 2014 and the PBS news segment) (see link in calendar above).*The quiz will CLOSE later than usual - at 11:59 PM on Saturday, 3/4, to give you time to focus on your pre-class reading, journal entry and blog post and Short Essay assignment.*  
  •   15 Tu 03/07
    • Synopsis: Today's class will look at agricultural production, the Farm Bill and institutions.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read What is the Farm Bill? (quick read) and Veggies are not the answer (quick read) and ONLY subsection A, entitled "Reallocate Food Subsidies Through Farm Bill Reform" of the broader section called called "What Congress Should Do to Effectively Reform Nutrition in Schools," on pages 1728-1730 of Are Food Subsidies Making Our Kids Fat?
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 11-Blog (see link in calendar above). In your journal entry, please try to synthesize all three readings and explain the tensions between them. Because there is no quiz this week, I'll pay extra attention to the quality of your journal entry and pre-class blog post. 
    • In-class activity: TBD.
    • Post-class assignment: Work on your team-led discussions/partial reports!

  •   16 Th 03/09
    • SynopsisToday we start our series of team-led discussions/partial reports.
    • Pre-class assignment: Before class review team A, B, and C's outlines on their respective project webpages and post some thoughts, reactions, comments, questions, etc. on the message board for each team which are linked in the schedule table at the top of this page.
    • In-class Activity: Presenters: Teams A, B, & C. Please see Group Projects Page for details on how we plan to organize the discussion.
  •   17 Tu 03/14
    • SynopsisContinuation of our series of team-led discussions/partial reports
    • Pre-class assignment: Before class review team D, E, and F's outlines on their respective project webpages and post some thoughts, reactions, comments, questions, etc. on the message board for each team which are linked in the schedule table at the top of this page.
    • In-class Activity: Presenters: Teams D, E, &F . Please see Group Projects Page for details on how we plan to organize the discussion.

  •   18 Th 03/16
    • Synopsis: CLASS CANCELLED.
    • Pre-class assignment: None.
    • In-class Activity: None.
  •   19 Tu 03/28
    • SynopsisIn this class Josephine Peigne will be joining us from France (via video) to talk with us about food systems, sustainability, and climate change in the European Union. Professor Doris Pellerin from the University Laval, Quebec, Canada will also be joining us (via video) in a discussion of dairy systems sustainability research in in province of Canada (which is Canada's "dairyland").
    • Pre-class assignment: Before class, please WATCH 2 videos of virtual international guests - the first is the videotaped presentation by Josephine Peigne and the second is the videotaped presentation by Dr. Doris Pellerin here.  
    • Please complete 1 journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and 2 blog posts, one for each of the guest speakers14-Blog and 15-Blog (see links in calendar above). In your journal entry, please try to synthesize what the guest speakers discuss and explain the tensions between them. Because there is no quiz this week, I'll pay extra attention to the quality of your journal entry and pre-class blog posts. 
    • In-class ActivityGrain Production and Sustainability in France and discussion of Dairy Sustainability Issues in Quebec.
    • OPTIONAL readings: For further information, please read Reimer & Prokopy 2014 (relating to Josephine Peigne's talk.) This reading will focus on U.S. agricultural policy. You can also read Belanger et al. (2015) (relating to Dr. Doris Pellerin's talk). This article will shed lights on how Quebec scientists have approached the assessment of sustainability of dairy farms in their province. 
  •   20 Th 03/30
    • SynopsisIn this class, Dr. Carlos Arriaga-Jordan from the Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico will join us (via video) to introduce us to the type of dairy farming of Mexico and then he will be leading a discussion of how small scale dairy production (smallholders) contributes to poverty alleviation in the highlands of Central Mexico. Then Carlos Gomez from Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Lima (Peru) will join us (via video) to discuss milk production in Peru and lead a discussion of an LCA of milk from Peru and how such a technique applies to low-income countries in general.
    • Pre-class assignment: Before class, please WATCH 2 videos of virtual international guests - the first is the videotaped presentation by Dr. Carlos Gomez from Peru and the second is the videotaped presentation by Dr. Carlos Arriaga from Mexico here.  
    • Please complete 1 journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and 2 blog posts, one for each of the guest speakers, 16-Blog and 17-Blog (see links in calendar above). In your journal entry, please try to synthesize what the guest speakers discuss and explain the tensions between them. Because there is no quiz this week, I'll pay extra attention to the quality of your journal entry and pre-class blog posts. 
    • In-class activities: Discussion of Mexican Dairy Systems and Poverty and Small-Scale Dairy Farming, as well as Dairy Development and Sustainability in Peru.
    • OPTIONAL readings: For further information on these topics, read Espinoza Ortega et al. 2007 (relating to Dr. Carlos Arriaga-Jordan's talk) and Bartl, Gomez, and Nemecek 2011 (relating to Carlos Gomez's talk). 
  •   21 Tu 04/04
    • SynopsisLife Cycle Assessment (cradle-to-grave analysis) offers the livestock industry a structured methodology to quantify environmental impact including GHG emissions. An LCA can help identify components or processes within production systems that should be targeted to reduce environmental impact. The paper of Beauchemin and McGeough (2013) introduces us to the LCA and its application to livestock ruminant agriculture. The authors felt compelled to end their conclusion with the following statement: "Ruminants make a useful contribution to society in that they produced high quality energy and protein for human consumption from land areas and cellulosic materials that would otherwise be very difficult to exploit."  What do you think?
    • Pre-class reading: Please read Beauchemin and McGeough 2013)
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 18-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activitiesLCA Q&A and group completion (ungraded) of 11-Quiz (Beauchemin and McGeough 2013).
    • Post-class assignment: No quiz for this class so I'll pay extra attention to your journal entry and blog post! However, you can test your understanding of the the material by looking at 11-Quiz questions and answers (see link above).
  •   22 Th 04/06
    • SynopsisToday, we are moving deeper into studying the sources of GHG emissions from dairy farms with the idea of finding relevant literature that shed some light on our case study (comparing organic versus conventional dairy systems). The paper of O'Brien et al. (2014) fits here because it compares various methods to allocate co-products; it compares grass-based dairy system from Ireland to confinement systems from the U.K and the United States. One of the main findings is that without accounting for carbon sequestration in the grassland (pasture) the grass-based and confinement dairy systems had similar carbon foot print per ton of milk. You will also learn more on how grassland carbon sequestration was estimated. Be prepared, we are going to learn more about the IPCC approach to calculating emissions.
    • Pre-Class assignment: Please read O'Brien et al., (2014).
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 19-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activitiesUnderstanding O'Brien et al. (2014) | Board Pictures from class discussion: Confinement System versus Grass-based System | Result, Discussion and Conclusion Activity | Short Power Point on Dairy Emission | Visualizing O-Brien data | Calculating Dairy Cow Enteric Methane Emission. For your reference, feel free to have a look at the related IPCC (2006) document.
    • Post-class assignment: Please complete 12-Quiz (Obrien et al. 2014) (see link in calendar above). 
  •   23 Tu 04/11
    • Synopsis: Today, we will focus on what sustainable crop production means, the history of sustainable crop production, and current ideas about tillage and crop rotation.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read Tilman et al. 2002
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 20-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class Activity: After discussion of your pre-class blog posts, Erin will be giving a short PowerPoint lecture about sustainable crop production. Afterward, we will have discussion.
    • Post-class assignment: Complete 13-Quiz (Tilman et al. 2002). (see link in calendar above). 
  •    24 Th 04/13
    • Synopsis: Today we are going move to exploring the emissions from soils and we will focus specifically on how different cropping systems alter nitrous oxide emission. These emissions are affected in part by management practices and also by weather-related factors that are beyond the producer's control. To what extent can a farm's decision influence nitrous oxide from the crops?
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read Osterholz et al., (2014): Seasonal Nitrous Oxide and Methane Fluxes from Grain- and Forage-Based Production Systems in Wisconsin, USA. 
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 21-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activity:(di)nitrification_slides_for_class_discussion.pptx , Challenges to Measure Nitrous Oxide Emissions | Nitrous Oxide form Soils: Management Related Issues | Seasonal and Weather Related Variations.
    • Post-class assignment: Complete 14-Quiz (Osterholz et al. 2014 article). See link above.
  •    25 Tu 04/18
    • Synopsis: Today's class will focus on manure management strategies and NO2.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please read the Chadwick-2011-Manure-Management article.
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 22-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class Activity: We will be discussing how the nitrogen cycle and manure interact and working a bit with 15-Quiz (ungraded) in teams during class.
    • Post-class assignment: No quiz for this class so I'll pay extra attention to your journal entry and blog post! However, you can test your understanding of the the material by looking at 15-Quiz (Chadwick et al. 2011) questions and answers (see link above).
  •    26 Th 04/20
    • SynopsisCarbon sequestration becomes an important issue if we switched the mind set from "reducing" emission to "offsetting" emissions within our agricultural systems. According to Lal (2004), strategies to increase the soil carbon pool include soil restoration and woodland regeneration, no-till farming, cover crops, nutrient management, manuring and sludge application, improved grazing, water conservation and harvesting, efficient irrigation, agroforestry practices, and growing energy crops on spare lands.
    • ANNOUNCEMENT: Your second short essay assignment is due TONIGHT to the Dropbox (link on the Syllabus page) at 11:59 PM (CST).
    • Pre-class assignmentLal (2004): Soil Carbon Sequestration Impacts on Global Climate Change and Food Security.
    • Please complete your journal entry (download template from syllabus page) and your 23-Blog (see link in calendar above).
    • In-class activitySoil_and_Carbon_Slides.pptx
    • Post-class assignment: Complete 16-Quiz (Lal 2004 article). See link above.
  •    27 Tu 04/25
    • Synopsis: Today we will hold our in-class debate on insect farming/rearing/production and the Farm Bill.  
    • Pre-class assignment:For your journal entry due on Tuesday (NO BLOG POST REQUIRED), please defend the position (for/against/compromise) you have been assigned in this debate based on which senator you have been assigned to represent. Think about the state from which your Senator hails, his/her previous occupations, and positions on other issues to develop a realistic idea of what kind of arguments you will need to put forth to represent your Senator.
    • In-class Activity: During the debate, you'll need to talk for 60 seconds as your Senator's representative, so make sure you have enough material to draw on. You'll also be working with the 4 teammates who share your same position (for, against, or compromise) during class to hash out your team's arguments (and counter-arguments).
    • Post-class assignment: As with all journal entries, you are expected to submit your in-class notes from today (for Thursday's 4/28 class). However, the in-class notes about the debate should primarily be a reflection on WHETHER and HOW your personal (not senatorial) position on the insect-farming debate changed or remained the same by the end of the debate and WHY.
  •    28 Th 04/27
    • SynopsisTeam final presentations and a course evaluation. 
    • Pre-class assignment: Please review the web pages (focusing on content primarily) for the following teams- A and F - and post some thoughts, reactions, comments, questions, etc. on the message board for each team (links for posting in the schedule table at the top of this page.) 
    • Also, make sure you've submitted your "in-class" notes journal entry from the debate on Tuesday to the course Dropbox by 1 pm. These notes should primarily be a reflection on WHETHER and HOW our personal (not senatorial) position on the insect-farming debate changed or remained the same by the end of the debate and WHY. 
    • In-class Activity: Please give thoughtful feedback via blog post on Team A's presentation here and Team F's presentation here .
  •   29 Tu 05/02
    • SynopsisTeam final presentations and a course evaluation.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please review the web pages (focusing on content primarily) for the following teams- C and D - and post some thoughts, reactions, comments, questions, etc. on the message board for each team (links for posting in the the schedule table at the top of this page).
    • In-class Activity: Please give thoughtful feedback via blog post on Team C's presentation here and Team D's presentation here.
  •   30 Th 05/04
    • SynopsisTeam final presentations and a course evaluation.
    • Pre-class assignment: Please review the web pages (focusing on content primarily) for the following teams - E & B - post some thoughts, reactions, comments, questions, etc. on the message board for each team (links for posting in the schedule table at the top of this page.)
    • In-class Activity: Please give thoughtful feedback via blog post on Team E's presentation here and Team B's presentation here.



Keywords:   Doc ID:69134
Owner:Michel W.Group:DS Food Systems, Sustainability and Climate Change
Created:2016-11-30 17:14 CSTUpdated:2017-05-02 23:54 CST
Sites:DS Food Systems, Sustainability and Climate Change
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