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Eisen Mill Guide

Before using the machine, fully read and understand the material covered in this guide. Using this guide does not mean you are a fully trained expert on a milling maching. If you have any questions please ask one of the staff.

Safety Caution

  • Rags shall be kept clear of the machine while operating. Stop the machine before attempting to wipe down its surface or the part, so rags do not become caught on rotating parts.
  • Turn machining lamp ON to have adequate visibility while operating the machine.
  • Do not run the cutting tool into the vise. Use the travel of the quill to prevent crashing the machine. Crashing the machine results in a 24 hour shop suspension.
  • Ensure proper set up of tooling and part. Ask questions if unsure.
  • Metal chips are sharp and can cause severe cuts. Do not try to remove them with your hands when they pile up. Turn machine off and use chip brush.
  • Avoid talking to anyone while running the machine. Do not permit anyone to fool around with the machine while you are operating it. The qualified person who made the reservation is the only one who should turn the machine on or off, or make any adjustments.
  • Remove sharp edges and burrs from the workpiece before removing it from the machine. Burrs and sharp edges can cause painful cuts.
  • Never clean a machine with compressed air.
  • Ask staff for help if you are unsure about any part of operating this machine.

Table of Contents

  • Machine Overview
  • Common Milling Machine Tools
  • Basic Operations
  • Finishing Up
  • Cleaning the Machine
  • Machine Overview

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    Milling is the process of machining using rotary cutters to remove material by advancing a cutter into a workpiece via an X-Y movement of the mill table. It is one of the most commonly used processes for machining custom parts to precise tolerances. In a vertical mill the spindle axis is vertically oriented. Milling cutters are held in the spindle and rotate on its axis. The spindle can be extended and the table can be raised/lowered, allowing plunge cuts and drilling along the Z-Axis. The milling machines at TEAM Lab are also capable of 2-axis CNC machining; additional training is required to use the machine in CNC mode. This guide only covers the manual operation of the milling machine.

    EisenMill_notext.jpg

    Head of Machine

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    The head of the machine contains the ON/OFF switch, Emergency Stop Switch, Spindle RPM readout, Variable Speed control knob, Gear selector switch, spindle brake, Air tool changer, Quill, Quill feed lever, Quill lock, Quill stop, Quill gauge, spindle.

    Air tool changer - The air tool changer, located directly on top of the spindle engages the drawbar to either secure or release the cutting tool. To operate the air tool changer use the operating buttons on the left side of the quill. To secure tooling, completely depress the ‘IN’ button and to release the cutting tool, completely depress the ‘OUT’ button. Note: when removing tooling protect your hand with a rag, cutting tools are very sharp.

    airtoolchanger.jpg

    ON/OFF switch - The important thing about turning the machine on and off is to run the spindle in a clockwise rotation. To achieve this, turn the on/off switch to forward when the machine is in high gear and turn the on/off switch to reverse when the machine is in low gear.

    onoffswitch.jpg

    Gear Selector Switch - The milling machine has two gears, high and low, with corresponding RPM ranges. Check TEAM Lab’s RPM calculator to determine the correct gear. To switch gears, slightly push the lever in and then rotate the lever down then back or forward. All the way back is low gear and all the way forward is high gear and in the middle is neutral. You may have to rotate the spindle to assist allowing the gears to mesh together.

    gears.gif

    Emergency Stop Switch - To turn power off to the machine when an abnormal condition exists, press the red emergency stop switch until it clicks off.

    estopswitch.jpg

    Variable Speed control knob - To adjust the RPM within the speed ranges, rotate the variable speed control knob clockwise to raise the speed and counterclockwise to lower speed. Start with the knob low in the range, turn the machine on, and raise speed to proper speed for the operation. Spindle RPM can only be adjusted when the spindle is rotating.

    speedknob.jpg

    Spindle RPM Readout - Red LCD display of actual spindle RPM and can only be read when spindle is on and rotating.

    spindleRPM.jpg

    Spindle Brake - When the machine is turned off, the spindle will continue to rotate for an amount of time and slowly come to a stop. To rapidly stop the spindle, pull the spindle brake until the spindle and tooling stop rotating.

    spindlebrake.jpg

    Quill - The quill allows the milling cutter to be raised and lowered in a manner similar to a drill press by moving the spindle in and out of the head.

    Quill lever - The quill lever located on the right side of the head is used to manually move the quill up and down and used to drill holes like a drill press.

    quillLever.jpg

    Quill lock - The quill lock is used to firmly hold the quill at a particular height for machining operations

    quillLOCK.jpg

    Quill stop - The quill stop provides a physical stop to prevent unwanted movement of the quill, even when it is locked. It can also provide a repeatable depth for drilling, machining, and other operations on the milling machine.


    Quill gauge - The quill gauge gives an accurate readout of the distance traveled by the quill and operated similarly to a digital caliper. The quill gauge turns on/off, changes units, and can be zeroed at a certain point. Note: Turn off quill gauge when completed with usage.

    quillgauge.jpg

    Knee

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    The knee contains the worktable, in normal cases the vise, x-handwheel, y-handwheel, z-handwheel, z-axis power-feed motor and moves up and down the column of the machine.


    Worktable - The worktable contains t-slots to hold down the vise, the workpiece, or other fixture setups.

    Vise - A vise is the most common workholding fixture and the jaws are hardened and ground for accuracy. The vises installed on the mills are indicated to be perfectly along the x-axis by using the back/fixed jaw and a dial indicator. If the vise is to be removed for different fixturing or if water based coolant is used, the vise needs to be re-indicated prior to the end of your reservation. Ask staff for assistance.


    X-Handwheel - Rotate the X-Handwheel clockwise to move the x-axis in the positive direction. Rotate the X-Handwheel counterclockwise to move the x-axis in the negative direction.


    Y-Handwheel - Rotate the Y-Handwheel counterclockwise to move the y-axis in the positive direction. Rotate the Y-Handwheel clockwise to move the y-axis in the negative direction.


    Z-Handwheel - Rotate the Z-Handwheel counterclockwise to move the z-axis in the positive direction. Rotate the Z-Handwheel clockwise to move the z-axis in the negative direction.


    Z-Axis power-feed motor - When larger movements along the column are required, the Z-axis feed motor provides the convenience of power feeding the table up or down. To engage the power-feed, lift the handle up for negative or upward movement or push the handle down for positive or downward movement.


    Note

    • Do not use the power-feed to feed stock into a cutting tool, the Z-Axis depth of cut is set with the manual handwheel while the tool is clear of the part and plunging is completed with the quill, quill lever, and quill stop.
    • Z-axis power-feed motor has to be completely stopped before switching directions or re-engaging the motor. This prevents damage to the plastic gear inside the motor

    Controller

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    The controller contains the controller Emergency Stop Switch, DRO functions, Math Help functions, and the other functions of the controller require additional training.

    The DRO is a numeric display and keypad that reads signals generated by linear encoders installed to track lathe axes, using these measures to keep track of and display to the machine operator the tool position in space. The Z-Axis reads the tooling movement along the length of the machine and X-Axis reads the tooling movement along the diameter of the part, even though machine movement is conducted in radius. There is no real need to enter any dimension to 4 decimal places, however make sure when presetting a number to press the decimal point button at the required place in the dimension

    EisenDRO_notext.jpg

    Using the Controller in Digital Readout Mode (DRO)

    • Enter DRO Mode - Press MODE, select DRO soft key.

    • Reset Absolute Reference (Set an axis to ‘zero’): Press X or Y or Z button (not the softkey), then press ABS SET to set selected axis to absolute zero at the current position. 

    • Set Absolute Reference (Set an axis to value other than 'zero'):  Press X or Y or Z button (not the softkey), then enter the numeric data with number pad (you will be able to read the entry at the bottom of the screen in the dialog line), then press ABS SET to set the selected axis absolute value to a preset location at the current machine position.

    • Changing units from inch to metric - When in DRO Mode, press SERV CODES softkey and enter ‘66’ to enter metric mode and ‘67’ to enter inch mode. The controller should be in inch mode when finished with your reservation.

    Note

    Do not use any of the softkeys, the arrow keys, as these control CNC functions of the controller and require additional training, unless switching units.

    droMODE_notext.jpg

    Common Service Codes

    The EMX controller has the ability to save a program created on a controller to a USB thumb drive and then loaded onto another controller.

    • The USB thumb drive must have a file named "PROGRAMS" in the root of the drive.
    • Insert the thumb drive into the back of the controller
    • Enter "DRO" mode
    • Press the soft-key next to "SERV CODE"
    • To save a file to the thumb drive, Enter "340" and press "ABS SET"
    • To load a file to the controller, Enter "341" and press "ABS SET"
    • Select the soft-key next to "COPY"
    • Press "MODE" and then the "PROG IN/OUT" soft-key. Your file will be located here, if a file was uploaded.

    The controller can also switch units from INCH to METRIC

    • Press the "DRO" soft-key
    • Press the "SERV CODES" soft-key
    • Input "67" for INCH
    • Input "66" for METRIC
    • Press the "ABS SET" button
    • Press the "SWITCH" soft-key. The controller will now read in the units selected.

    Using the controller in Math Help

    Prints are, unfortunately, not always drawn and labeled in such a way as to provide all of the points necessary for machining. To minimize this problem, the ProtoTRAK EMX Controller provides a graphic math help function which can be used to automatically calculate the points of intersection, centers of arcs, trig functions, square roots, etc.

    • To enter the Math Help Mode - press MODE and then press the MATH HELP soft key
    • If you already know the math help type you want (see below) press the TYPE # softkey and enter the number and SET. If you do not know the type, select from A through E using the soft keys arrows.

     

    Type #

    Info you want to know

    Info you have

    10

    Intersection of two lines

    2 points on each line

    11

    Intersection of two lines

    • 2 points on one line • 1 point on the other line • angle between the lines

    12

    Intersection of two lines

    • 2 points on one line • 1 point on the other line • a radius tangent to both lines when one of the points on the two points known line is also on the radius

    13

    Intersection of a line and an arc

    • 2 points on the line • arc center • arc radius

    14

    Intersection of a line and an arc

    • 2 points on the line • 2 points on the arc • arc radius

    15

    Intersection of two arcs

    • center of each arc • radius of each arc

    16

    Intersection of a line tangent to two arcs (line does not cross arc centers)

    • center of each arc • radius of each arc

    17

    Intersection of a line tangent to an arc

    • one point on the line • center of the arc • radius of the arc

    18

    Intersection of a line tangent to two arcs (line crosses arc centers)

    • center of each arc • radius of each arc

    19

    Center and points of intersection of an arc tangent to two arcs

    • 2 of the arc centers • all 3 radii

    20

    Center of an arc

    • 2 points on the arc • radius of the arc

    21

    Point on an arc

    • center of the arc • another point on the arc • angle between known and unknown points

    22

    Radius of an arc or circle

    • 1 point on the arc • center of the arc

    23

    Center of an arc or circle

    • 2 points on the arc • angle between the 2 points

    24

    Center and radius of an arc or circle

    • 3 different points on the arc

    25

    Cartesian (X and Y) location

    • polar (R and angle) coordinates

    26

    Angle in decimal

    • angle degrees, minutes and seconds

    27

    Accurate X Y Center

    • given X Y Center • 2 points on the arc

    28

    Sides and angles of a right triangle

    • at least one side and another side or an angle

    Tooling Overview

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    Cutting Tools

    Inserted Face Mills

    OctoMill.jpg

    Center Cutting End Mills

    Endmills.jpg centercuttingnoncentercutting.jpg

    Multi-fluted End Mills

    MultiFlute.jpg

    Ball Nose End Mills

    BallNose.jpg

    Other Specialty Cutters

    OtherCutters.jpg

    Collets and Tool Holders

    Spring collets and Tool Holders accommodate straight shank end mills and drills, and they are used to secure the tooling to the spindle by threading onto the drawbar and clamping onto the shank of the tooling. Endmills must be secured to the machine with a collet or tool holder, NOT A DRILL CHUCK.

    r8collet.jpg

    Another method of securing the endmill to the machine is by using a tool holder. See staff to use.

    r8toolholder.jpg

    Drill Chuck

    A drill chuck is a specialised self-centering, three-jaw chuck, usually with capacity of 0.5 in or 0.375 in and used to hold drill bits or other rotary tools, such as spot drills, center drills, countersinks, reamers, edge finders and more. Drill chucks are not use to secure endmills to the machine

    MillDrillChuck.jpg

    Other Mill Tooling

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    Parallels

    Parallels are rectangular blocks of metal, commonly made from tool steel and have 2, 4 or 6 faces ground to a precise surface finish. They are used when a mill machining operation requires work to be held in a vise or with clamps - to keep work parallel or raised evenly such as to give adequate height for the cutting tool/spindle to pass over.

    Parallels.jpg

    Edge Finder

    The edge finder is a precision positioning tool that will locate the edge of the work in relation to the center of the spindle with high accuracy.

    EdgeFinders.jpg

    Rubber Mallet

    Used to apply force to parts with a reduced risk of damaging them

    DeadBlow.jpg

    File

    Used to remove fine amounts of material and burrs from a workpiece

    MetalFile.jpg

    Micro Drill Chuck

    Fits in a 1/2" collet and can fit drill bits from [0.016"-0.125"]

    MircoDrillChuck.jpg

    Measurement

    Measurement is perhaps one of the most fundamental concepts in machining and without the ability to measure accurately, it would be difficult for machine operators to manufacture parts. Learning how to properly use measurement tools is vital to the operation of any machine

    Caliper.jpg

    Using a digital caliper: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fBycE1dk0I

    Micrometer.jpg

    Reading a Micrometer: https://www.wisc-online.com/learn/career-clusters/manufacturing/mtl1902/reading-a-micrometer

    Basic Operations

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    Placing tool holders in the spindle

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    • Position the quill all the way up and lock quill lock.
    • Clean the mating surfaces
    • Align the keyway on tool holder with the key in the spindle and insert the tooling into the spindle far as it will go.
    • Press the IN button firmly until tool holder is secured in the spindle.


    Note

    • When using a collet, hold tool in the collet with your index finger and thumb while pressing the IN button.
    • Make sure when securing an end mill or drill in a collet that the flutes are exposed, the tool clamped as close to the flutes as possible while clamping on the shank of the tool.
    • Endmills are to be secured in the machine with collets only, no drill chucks with endmills.

    Removing tools from spindle

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    • Ensure that the spindle is turned off and stopped
    • Raise the quill all the way up and lock the quill
    • Grasp the drill chuck with your hand and press the OUT button firmly until the chuck is removed from the spindle.
    • To remove an endmill in a collet, place a rag in your hand and let the tool and collet fall in your hand, press the OUT button firmly until the collet and endmill are removed from the spindle.


    Note

    Do not pull the tooling out of the spindle, the tooling will drop out. The operator needs to catch the tooling as it is released from the machine.

    Turning on the mill and setting RPM

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    • Determine correct RPM by using TEAM Lab’s RPM calculator.
    • Place mill in the appropriate gear (high/low) based on the RPM.
      • If the mill is not in appropriate gear move the speed range lever to the correct position if it doesn't engage easily turn the spindle by hand until the lever moves and snaps into place.
      • Gear handle is located on the right side of the mill head.
      • When the handle is horizontal, with knob facing the operator, the machine is in high gear.
      • When the machine is in low gear, the handle is horizontal with the knob pointing away from the operator.
      • The machine is in neutral when the handle is vertical and the spindle turns freely by hand.
    • Turn the Variable Speed control knob, located right of the ON/OFF switch, all the way down.
    • In high gear, the spindle ON/OFF switch needs to be turned to forward. In low gear, the spindle ON/OFF switch needs to be turned to reverse.
    • Turn the spindle ON/OFF switch on and slowly turn the Variable Speed control knob until the Spindle RPM Readout is approximately at the appropriate RPM.
    • Turn the spindle ON/OFF switch to the OFF position to turn the spindle off.


    Warning

    Do not turn the spindle on unless it is in gear.

    Placing stock in the vise

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    • Wipe the vise jaws clean with a shop rag and check for debris with hands
    • Place parallel(s) on vise ways
    • Place part on top of the parallel(s)
    • Tighten vise jaws by rotating the vise handle clockwise
    • Using a dead blow hammer, forcefully tap the part until the parallel(s) is(are) tight.
    • The parallel(s) shouldn't move if this is done correctly

    Note

    • Only machined edges can be used to clamp with vise jaws.
    • Deburr part edges before securing them in a vise
    • See staff for other set ups: clamping directly to table, indexable chuck, collet block, fixture plate, sidewinder vise, dual vises, machinable jaws, v-blocks, and more.

    Climb Milling versus Conventional Milling

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    Milling operations can be classified into one of two distinct methods and when using TEAM Lab’s machines climb milling is the preferred method.

    Climb_Conv1.JPG
    • Conventional milling: The work is fed into the rotation of the cutter. The chip thickness starts at zero thickness, and increases up to the maximum. The cut is so light at the beginning that the tool does not cut, but slides across the surface of the material, until sufficient pressure is built up and the tooth suddenly bites and begins to cut. This deforms the material (at point A on the diagram, left), hardening it, and dulling the tool. The sliding and biting behaviour leaves a poor finish on the material.
    • Climb milling: The work moves in the same direction as cutter rotation. Each tooth engages the material at a definite point, and the width of the cut starts at the maximum and decreases to zero. The chips are disposed behind the cutter, leading to easier swarf removal. The sliding action of conventional milling is eliminated, resulting in a better finish and longer tool life

    Using Z-axis power-feed

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    • When larger movements along the column are required, the Z-axis power-feed motor provides the convenience of power feeding the table up or down.
    • Lift the handle up for negative Z-axis or upward table movement until the part is no closer than 1” from the cutting tool. The rest of the distance can be made by Z-axis handwheel or with the quill handle.
    • Push the handle down for positive Z-axis or downward table movement.

    Note

    • Do not use the power-feed to feed stock into a cutting tool, setting the depth of cut is done with the manual handwheel with the endmill clear of the part and plunging is done with the machine on and feeding the endmill into the part with the quill lever.
    • Z-axis power-feed motor has to be completely stopped before switching directions or re-engaging the motor. This prevents damage to the plastic gear inside the motor.

    Setting the Z-Axis with the touch off method

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    • Install the proper tooling
    • Set the appropriate RPM with TEAM Lab’s RPM calculator
    • Position the table so that your part is directly under the end mill, raise the z-axis with the Z-Axis power-feed until your part is a few inches below the end mill
    • Lower the quill until the end mill is almost touching your part (~1/16”) and lock it in place
    • Raise the quill stop all the way up. This gives you a reference point if you unlock the quill and to prevent the end mill from pulling itself into your part
    • Unlock the quill, raise it up, and bring it back down firmly onto the quill stop before locking. This will ensure the quill stop’s accuracy
    • Raise the table with the z-axis handwheel until the end mill barely makes contact with the work piece and a small chip is formed
    • ‘Zero’ the z-axis on the DRO. The operator can also set the DRO to the height or thickness of the part if known. Do Not press the “return absolute zero” softkey
    • Move the x-axis to move the endmill clear of the workpiece.

    Note

    If your part is already squared and machined to dimension, staff can assist in setting the Z-Axis by other methods

    Facing a Part (machining off material along the Z-axis)

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    Face milling is done when the surface being machined is parallel with the cutter face. Large, flat surfaces are machined with octomills and large diameter multi flute endmills.

    • Set the Z-Axis to ‘zero’ or to a known value using the touch off method
    • Move the x-axis to move the endmill clear of the workpiece
    • Move the z-axis in the negative direction, clockwise rotation of the handwheel. A roughing depth of cut should be [0.030”-0.050”] depending upon material and cutter. A finishing depth of cut should be [0.010”-0.015”]. Never use the power feed to make this movement.
    • With the spindle on, rotate the x and/or y handwheels to machine the surface of the part until all material in this layer is machined away
    • Repeat until part is at desired dimension

    Note

    • See squaring up stock section to face all sides of a block
    • See machining a shoulder to machine a portion of a face to a specific dimension.
    • Always use cutting fluid between passes

    Setting x or y axis with touch off method

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    Setting the x-axis with touch off method

    • Install the proper tooling
    • Secure part properly so that the portion to be machined is hanging off the side of the vise. Only hang out the amount to be machined plus enough for a little clearance (~1/16”)
    • Set the appropriate RPM with TEAM Lab’s RPM calculator
    • Lower the quill slightly (at least the thickness of part) and lock it in place
    • Raise the quill stop all the way up. This gives you a reference point if you unlock the quill and to prevent the end mill from pulling itself into your part
    • Unlock the quill, raise it up, and bring it back down firmly onto the quill stop before locking. This will ensure the quill stop’s accuracy
    • Position the table so that your part is to the left of the end mill, raise the z-axis with the Z-Axis power-feed until the tip of the end mill is slightly below the workpiece
    • Move the table with the x-axis handwheel until the end mill barely makes contact with the work piece and a small chip is formed
    • Move the y-axis to move the endmill clear of the workpiece.
    • ‘Zero’ the x-axis on the DRO. The operator can also set the DRO to the dimension of the part if known. Do Not press the “return absolute zero” softkey

    Setting the y-axis with touch off method

    • Install the proper tooling
    • Secure part properly so that the portion to be machined is hanging off the side of the vise. Only hang out the amount to be machined plus enough for a little clearance (~1/16”)
    • Set the appropriate RPM with TEAM Lab’s RPM calculator
    • Lower the quill slightly (at least the thickness of part) and lock it in place
    • Raise the quill stop all the way up. This gives you a reference point if you unlock the quill and to prevent the end mill from pulling itself into your part
    • Unlock the quill, raise it up, and bring it back down firmly onto the quill stop before locking. This will ensure the quill stop’s accuracy.
    • Position the table so that your part is to the left of the end mill, raise the z-axis with the Z-Axis power-feed until the tip of the end mill is slightly below the workpiece.
    • Move the table with the y-axis handwheel until the end mill barely makes contact with the work piece and a small chip is formed
    • Move the x-axis to move the endmill clear of the workpiece
    • ‘Zero’ the y-axis on the DRO. The operator can also set the DRO to the dimension of the part if known. Do Not press the “return absolute zero” softkey

    Side or Plain Milling a part (machining a part to length)

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    Side milling is done when the surface being machined is parallel with the side of the cutter.

    Side milling using x-axis dimension

    • Set the X-Axis to ‘zero’ or to a known value using the touch off method
    • Move the y-axis to move the endmill clear of the workpiece
    • Move the x-axis in the direction to remove material, clockwise rotation of the handwheel moves the table right/positive and counterclockwise rotation moves the table left/negative
      • A roughing depth of cut should be [0.030”-0.050”] depending upon material and cutter
      • A finishing depth of cut should be [0.010”-0.015”]
      • Do not use the power feed to make this movement until completion of CNC 1 upgrade
    • With the spindle on, rotate the y handwheel to machine the surface of the part until all material in this layer is machined away. Use climb milling technique.
    • Repeat until part is at desired dimension

    Side milling using y-axis dimension

    • Set the Y-Axis to ‘zero’ or to a known value using the touch off method
    • Move the x-axis to move the endmill clear of the workpiece
    • Move the y-axis in the direction to remove material, clockwise rotation of the handwheel moves the table backwards/negative and counterclockwise rotation moves the table forward/positive
      • A roughing depth of cut should be [0.030”-0.050”] depending upon material and cutter
      • A finishing depth of cut should be [0.010”-0.015”]
      • Do not use the power feed to make this movement until completion of CNC 1 upgrade
    • With the spindle on, rotate the x handwheel to machine the surface of the part until all material in this layer is machined away. Use climb milling technique.
    • Repeat until part is at desired dimension

    Note

    • See squaring up stock section to face all sides of a block
    • See machining a shoulder to machine a portion of a face to a specific dimension
    • Always use cutting fluid between passes.

    Squaring up a block

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    When starting a lot of projects on the vertical milling machine, it will be necessary to true up the sides of the workpiece before you can begin milling. This is due to inconsistencies in the surfaces and angles of rough-cut materials, even extruded bar stock can have enough variation that you need to clean it up if you're doing precise work. It is recommended and sometimes required by TEAM Lab that parts be machined square before machining any features.

    Tools Required: Long round dowel, file, dead-blow hammer, large diameter facemill, ¾” endmill with a length of cut long enough to side mill the ends, collet, parallels, machinist square, micrometer or caliper, sharpie

    • Deburr all edges
    • Number all sides 1 thru 4 rotating the part 90 degrees between each number, starting with 1 on the longest side
    • The ends will be 5 and 6
    • Insert dowel between the work and movable jaw with #1 side facing up.
    • Machine the first surface
    • Remove the burrs and place the first surface against the fixed vise jaw. Insert dowel between the work and movable jaw if that portion of the work is rough or not square.
    • Machine the second surface.
    • Remove the burrs and reposition the work onto parallels in the vise to machine the third side. Insert dowel between the work and movable jaw if that portion of the work is rough or not square. Then strike the piece with a hammer to ensure it lays flat on the parallels before completely tightening the vise. This side must be machined to dimension
    • Take a light cut and measure the thickness with micrometer or caliper. Do not remove from machine to measure
    • Set Z-Axis to the measured value in the DRO and continue to machine to thickness by using the Z-Axis handwheel and moving the table. Note: Use your quill stop and quill gauge at ‘zero’ to provide repeatability and accuracy. Always stop the machine before making any measurements
    • Remove the burrs and reposition the work onto parallels in the vise to machine the fourth side. Then strike the piece with a hammer to ensure it lays flat on the parallels before completely tightening the vise. This side must be machined to dimension.
    • Take a light cut and measure the thickness with micrometer or caliper. Do not remove from machine to measure.
    • Set Z-Axis to the measured value in the DRO and continue to machine to thickness by using the Z-Axis handwheel and moving the table. Note: Use your quill stop and quill gauge at ‘zero’ to provide repeatability and accuracy. Always stop the machine before making any measurements
    • If the piece is short enough, the fifth side, the first end, may be machined by placing it in a vertical position with the aid of a machinist square. If the piece is too long to stand vertical, hang the fifth side, first end, of the piece off to the side of the vise with only enough material to completely machine square plus an extra [0.125”]. Note: Do not press ‘Return ABS Zero’ softkey when using the DRO in this fashion. If done strategically, the setup for the fourth side can hang the part to the side of the vise in preparation for the fifth side.
    • If the piece is short enough, the final side, the second end, may be machined by placing it in a vertical position with the aid of a machinist square. If the piece is too long to stand vertical, hang the final side, second end, of the piece off to the side of the vise with only enough material to completely machine to dimension. Follow the machining a part to length procedure to machine the part to dimension in this step. Note: Do not press ‘Return ABS Zero’ softkey when using the DRO in this fashion

    SquareUpBlock.PNG

    Note

    • Watch our youtube video for further clarification: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdEM77NDejE&t=23s
    • Deburr edges before putting part into vise
    • Do not press ‘Return ABS Zero’ softkey
    • Parts cannot be clamped on saw cut, flame cut, or waterjet cut edges

    Edge Finding Procedure

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    This procedure is used to find the exact X-Y location of a part in relation to the center axis of the spindle. This should be done using machined edges. Only one axis can be indicated at a time.

    Tools Required: Drill chuck or collet to hold edge finder; edge finder, caliper, file

    • Ensure part is properly deburred and clean, use file to remove burrs on part
    • Measure diameter of edge finder tip with caliper
    • Install drill chuck into spindle
    • Install edge finder into drill chuck
    • With spindle running between 600-800 RPM, start with tip of edge finder to the side of edge of part.
    • Slowly feed tip of tool towards part
    • Edge finder tip will gradually become centered with its shank
    • When the tip becomes exactly aligned with the edge, it will abruptly jump sideways about 1/32”
    • When tip of edge finder jumps, stop table movement immediately
    • Center of spindle will be exactly one-half tip diameter away from the edge of part
    • Set the measured axis to “zero” in DRO
    • Raise quill up to clear the tip of the edge finder from part
    • Move table exactly one-half tip diameter in the measured direction. The center of the edge finder should now be over the edge of the part in the direction measured.
    • If the edge is not the desired ‘zero’, adjust DRO or table to set any desired offset.
    • Repeat process to indicate other axis

    EdgeFinderProcedure.PNG 

    Note

    This process can be used to find the center axis of a circle or hole, see staff for specifics or watch this youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8qvRe_Y4tg

    Machining a Slot (plunge milling)

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    A center cutting end mill may be used to cut a slot or an internal feature, one can plunge into material like a drill press.

    Tools Required: Center cutting end mill with a diameter the same or smaller than the width of the slot or to fit any required radius, collet, parallels, file, hammer, micrometer or caliper, edge finder

    • Secure part in vise using parallels or secure part with other fixture as necessary
    • Determine the X-Y coordinates of your part by using the edge finding procedure.
    • Set Z-Axis with touch off method
    • Raise quill and set Z by moving table up [0.030”-0.050”] for a roughing pass
    • Plunge in by using the quill lever until bottomed out on the quill stop and quill gauge reads ‘zero’. Once firmly on quill stop, lock the quill
    • Complete machining pass by moving in the X and Y handwheels to desired dimensions and clear chips with blue chip brush
    • When finished with pass, unlock and raise quill. Set Z using table and repeat steps until desired depth is reached. [0.030”-0.050”] for a roughing pass and [0.010”-0.015”] for a finishing pass. The amount removed may be adjusted depending on the type of material and size of end mill
    • If machining through, the break through pass should extend past the bottom of the part.
    • Use a swivel deburr tool to deburr any internal features

    Note

    • Parts cannot be clamped on saw cut, flame cut, or waterjet cut edges
    • A sharp end mill is necessary to plunge straight into material
    • A squared part is recommended before machining any features

    Machining a shoulder or multilevel surfaces

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    Shoulder milling generates two faces simultaneously, which requires side milling in combination with face milling achieving a true, ninety-degree shoulder. Shoulder milling can be performed by using square end mills.

    Tools Required: Square end mill with a larger diameter and a length just long enough to machine the shoulder, collet, parallels, file, hammer, micrometer or caliper, edge finder

    Machining a shoulder by adjusting the Z-Axis (face milling)

    • Secure part in vise using parallels or secure part with other fixture as necessary
    • Determine the X-Y coordinates of your part by using the edge finding procedure
    • Set Z-Axis with touch off method
    • Move table so part is clear of end mill
    • Set Z by moving table up [0.030”-0.050”] for a roughing pass
    • Complete machining pass by moving in the X and Y handwheels to desired dimensions and clear chips with blue chip brush
    • When finished with pass, unlock and raise quill. Set Z using table and repeat steps until desired depth is reached. [0.030”-0.050”] for a roughing pass and [0.010”-0.015”] for a finishing pass. The amount removed may be adjusted depending on the type of material and size of end mill.
    • Use a swivel deburr tool to deburr any features.

    Machining a shoulder by side milling (The list below is for setting depth of cut with X-Axis but can be substituted to set the depth of cut with Y-Axis)

    • Secure part in vise using parallels or secure part with other fixture as necessary
    • Determine the X-Y coordinates of your part by using the edge finding procedure. Account for the diameter of the end mill
    • X-Y coordinates of your part can also be found via touch off method
    • Set Z-Axis with touch off method
    • Move table so part is clear of end mill
    • Set Z by moving table up to final depth
    • Set depth of cut with the X-Axis [0.030”-0.050”] for a roughing pass
    • Complete machining pass by moving the Y handwheel to desired dimensions and clear chips with blue chip brush. Ensure climb milling method is observed. Avoid letting end mill sit in an inside corner
    • When finished with pass, reset tool location to starting location. Set X using table and repeat steps until desired dimension is reached. [0.030”-0.050”] for a roughing pass and [0.010”-0.015”] for a finishing pass. The amount removed may be adjusted depending on the type of material and size of end mill
    • Use a swivel deburr tool to deburr any features

    Note

    • Parts cannot be clamped on saw cut, flame cut, or waterjet cut edges
    • A sharp end mill is necessary to plunge straight into material
    • A squared part is recommended before machining any features

    Drilling a hole on the Mill

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    Tools Required: Drill chuck, edge finder, spot drill, appropriate drill bits, countersink, hole deburr tool, swivel deburr tool, parallels, mallet, file

    • Install drill chuck into spindle
    • Deburr all part edges
    • Secure part into vise resting on parallels and ensure part is tight on parallels and parallels are out of the path of any drilled holes
    • Determine the X-Y coordinates of your part by using the edge finding procedure
    • Move table to hole location
    • Spot drill all holes using appropriate RPM from RPM calculator
    • Set the height of a drill bit by moving the table to a machined reference surface, gently lower quill until drill bit tip touches the surface, while holding the quill lever in place, ‘zero’ the quill gauge
    • Move table back to hole location
    • Drill all holes with quill lever in a peck motion. For blind holes use quill gauge for accuracy. Use appropriate RPM from RPM calculator. If larger holes than ½” are required, see staff for assistance.
    • Deburr holes with a countersink. Use appropriate RPM for a countersink [200-300]

    Hand Tapping a hole on the Mill

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    Tools Required: Drill Chuck or collet, tap, tap handle, dead center or spring loaded dead center

    • Drill any holes required to be tapped
    • Install drill chuck into spindle
    • Install dead center into drill chuck, if Z-Axis travel is limited install dead center into collet
    • Install tap into tap handle
    • Using the quill lever, line up end of tap handle or tap with dead center and tip of the tap with the hole
    • Start turning the tap with a light down pressure from the quill
    • Once the tap is engaged and cutting threads, the dead center is only providing support for the tap and pressure is no longer needed
    • Continue turning the tap 3 half-turns forward and 1 half-turn backwards to break the chip at the cutting edge of the tap
    • For a blind hole, when tap becomes difficult to turn, stop, back tap out, clean chips from hole, and if needed re-insert tap into hole or switch to a bottoming tap to finish off the threads

    Other Mill operations

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    For all of the more advanced milling operations, see staff to set up

    • Using a dial indicator on the mill
    • Squaring and indicating a part
    • Squaring and indicating a vise
    • Using a boring head
    • Using special fixtures

    Troubleshooting

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    • Turning on the Controller
    • Ridges on surface after a face milling

    Cleaning the Machine

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    • Water based coolant
    • Cleaning the t-slots
    • Turning things off
    • Resetting DRO to inch




Keywords:Mill, milling machine, end mill, eisen   Doc ID:92518
Owner:Eric E.Group:TEAM Lab Documentation
Created:2019-06-18 11:53 CDTUpdated:2019-09-18 14:39 CDT
Sites:TEAM Lab Documentation
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