What Makes a Good Power Point Presentation?

This document provides general guidelines to prepare and deliver effective power point presentations. These guidelines emerged from your professor's reflection on how to improve the quality of presentations based on previous years' presentations.

Organization of the Sides:

Have a clear outline. Use your final report as a "guide" to build your power point slides using the following outline:
  • Introduction and Objective(s)
  • Materials and Methods
  • Results
    • Forage Ingredients and Composition
    • Concentrates (By-proucts) Ingredients and Composition
    • Minerals, Vitamins and Feed Additives
  • Animal / Group Characteristics
  • Current ration
    • Ingredient Mix and Composition (Table 5)
    • Assessment / Evaluation of Current Ration / Unresovled issues, etc.
  • Alternate ration
    • Objective
    • Materials and Methods
    • Results
  • Conclusions

Quality of Sides:

Simplicity and consistency are key:
  • Choose a simple (non distracting) layout for the background, slide title, text, tables and figures and repeat as consistently as possible;
  • Pay attention to formatting and be consistent across slides for font size, colors, lines, table footnotes, and so forth;
  • Make sure that any icon or image (jpg) contribute to the understanding of the message you are attempting to convey with that slide;
  • Check very carefully for grammar and spelling and constant punctuation.

Quality of Content:

Here I think of organization of the presentation (logical progressing) and the four "Cs":
  • Organization (Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results (and Discussion), Conclusions);
  • Correctness; (Inaccurate --- partially (in)accurate--- Accurate);
  • Completness; (Incomplete --- partially (in)complete --- Complete);
  • Clarity; (Confusing --- partially clear --- Crystal Clear);
  • Conciseness; (Verbiose --- Concise --- Too brief).

Quality of Oral Presentation:

Never deliver a power presentation without having practiced it multiple time. Focus on the four "Cs":
  • Mechanics:
    • Talk to your audience (not to the computer or the projection screen);
    • Use a pointer or build animation as a mean to pace yourself and help your audience match what they hear with what they see.
  • Content (what is being said):
    • Demonstrate mastery of the content. Your words must reflect the fact that you know much more than what is on the slide(s);
    • Correctness; (Inaccurate --- partially (in)accurate--- Accurate);
    • Completness; (Incomplete --- partially (in)complete --- Complete);
    • Clarity; (Confusing --- partially clear --- Crystal Clear);
    • Conciseness; (Verbiose --- Concise --- Too brief).




Keywords:What Makes a Good Power Point Presentation?   Doc ID:58148
Owner:Michel W.Group:DS 414 Ruminant Nutrition
Created:2015-11-11 16:34 CDTUpdated:2015-11-19 13:22 CDT
Sites:DS 414 Ruminant Nutrition
Feedback:  0   0